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Call: 844-234-LINE (5463)    Text: 87028     Chat

What Does

Family Violence Involve?

Learn the true definition.  Be Prepared.  Help break the cycle of abuse.

Any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a child (under 18) by a parent, caregiver or another person. While all types of abuse and neglect can occur, the four common types of child abuse are physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect.

Protecting children from abuse and neglect is a community responsibility.  Most adults want to help but are unsure of how to get involved.  If you think a child is being abused or neglected, you should report it as soon as you become aware of it.

Signs of child abuse or neglect may vary based on the type. Here are some common signs:

Unexplained injuries, such as bruises
Extreme behaviors, such as excessive crying, truancy or running away
Poor hygiene and unsuitable clothing
Excessive fear of parent(s), caregiver(s) or going home
Depression or excessive crying
Poor peer relationships or inability to relate to children of the same age
Sudden change in behavior
Constant hunger, tiredness or lack of energy
Attention-seeking behaviors

close
Click here for Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect

Any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a teen by an individual who is in a current or former dating relationship with that teen. Teen dating abuse may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal or emotional in nature. While abuse often occurs as a pattern of controlling behavior, a single episode of abuse is cause for concern.

It is important for parent(s) to know whom your teens are dating and to talk with them about healthy relationships. Keep in mind that some teens may mistake attention as expressions of love when in fact they are warning signs of control.

Signs that a teen may be a victim of an abusive relationship:

Giving up things that are important
Isolation from friends
Changes in appearance, weight, grades or behavior
Unexplainable injuries
Fear of making partner angry
Preoccupied with pleasing partner
Apologizes for partner’s behavior
Excuses to questions about the relationship

close
Click here for Signs of Teen Dating Abuse

When an abusive family member or partner causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to an individual with whom they are in a trusted relationship. Domestic violence may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal or emotional in nature. While abuse often occurs as a pattern of controlling behavior, a single episode of abuse is cause for concern.

If you or someone you know is being abused by a partner or family member, it is important to get help safely.  If a victim chooses to leave an abusive relationship, for various reasons, it may take multiple attempts to leave.  Providing non-judgmental support is critical.

Signs to be aware of if you suspect someone is being abused:

Physical injuries such as broken bones or unexplained bruising
Claims of being “clumsy” or “accident prone”
Frequent absenteeism or tardiness
Isolation
Harassing phone calls, text messages, emails or notes on cars
Comments about stress at home
Talking about the spouse or partner’s anger or temper
Leaving work early or coming in late
Making mistakes on the job

close
Click here for Signs of Domestic Abuse

 

Abuse occurs in all types of relationships and among people with varying backgrounds of age, race, religion, financial status, sexual orientation and education. Elder abuse is any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a person 60 years of age or older. Elder abuse may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal or emotional in nature and may also include neglect or exploitation.

The signs that elder abuse may be occurring include the following:

Unexplained signs of injury
Untreated physical problems such as bed sores
Behavior from the elder that mimics dementia such as rocking, sucking or mumbling to oneself
Broken bones, sprains or dislocations
Caregiver’s refusal to allow you to see the elder alone
Torn, stained or bloody underclothing
Unusual weight loss, malnutrition or dehydration
Unsanitary living conditions such as dirt, bugs, soiled bedding and clothes

close
Click here for Signs of Elder Abuse

 Get Answers

In difficult circumstances, some of the most frequently asked questions and answers may help.

The “Where’s The Line?” campaign is a first-of-its-kind effort designed to increase awareness of family violence and to change the behaviors of individuals who may be witnessing such acts. For the purpose of the campaign, we refer to these individuals as “bystanders.”

Bystanders are three times more likely to intervene after seeing a bystander campaign.  The Center For Family Safety and Healing (TCFSH) created “Where’s The Line?” to offer resources that can educate the general public, answer questions and triage requests to appropriate services.

The main objective of the campaign is to give bystanders in central Ohio a resource to safely and appropriately help victims. 

By Focusing on the bystander and empowering people to be able to recognize all forms of family violence, we hope to encourage reporting.
– Abigail S. Wexner, Founder & Board Chair, TCFSH

Bystanders say that they are not getting involved for fear of being wrong.  We say make the call and risk being right.
– Karen S. Days, President, TCFSH

Child Abuse and Neglect

Any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a child (under 18) by a parent, caregiver or another person. While all types of abuse and neglect can occur, the four common types of child abuse are physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect.

Teen Dating Abuse

Any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a teen by an individual who is in a current or former dating relationship with that teen. Teen dating abuse may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal or emotional in nature. While abuse often occurs as a pattern of controlling behavior, a single episode of abuse is cause for concern.

Domestic Abuse

When an abusive family member or partner causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to an individual with whom they are in a trusted relationship. Domestic violence may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal or emotional in nature. While abuse often occurs as a pattern of controlling behavior, a single episode of abuse is cause for concern.

Elder Abuse

Abuse occurs in all types of relationships and among people with varying backgrounds of age, race, religion, financial status, sexual orientation and education. Elder abuse is any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a person 60 years of age or older. Elder abuse may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal or emotional in nature and may also include neglect or exploitation.

There are some common signs that abuse may be occurring.  Click below for information on the signs of abuse:

Signs of child abuse or neglect may vary based on the type. Here are some common signs:

Unexplained injuries, such as bruises
Extreme behaviors, such as excessive crying, truancy or running away
Poor hygiene and unsuitable clothing
Excessive fear of parent(s), caregiver(s) or going home
Depression or excessive crying
Poor peer relationships or inability to relate to children of the same age
Sudden change in behavior
Constant hunger, tiredness or lack of energy
Attention-seeking behaviors

close
Child Abuse and Neglect

Signs that a teen may be a victim of an abusive relationship:

Giving up things that are important
Isolation from friends
Changes in appearance, weight, grades or behavior
Unexplainable injuries
Fear of making partner angry
Preoccupied with pleasing partner
Apologizes for partner’s behavior
Excuses to questions about the relationship

close
Teen Dating Abuse

Signs to be aware of if you suspect someone is being abused:

Physical injuries such as broken bones or unexplained bruising
Claims of being “clumsy” or “accident prone”
Frequent absenteeism or tardiness
Isolation
Harassing phone calls, text messages, emails or notes on cars
Comments about stress at home
Talking about the spouse or partner’s anger or temper
Leaving work early or coming in late
Making mistakes on the job

close
Domestic Abuse

The signs that elder abuse may be occurring include the following:

Unexplained signs of injury
Untreated physical problems such as bed sores
Behavior from the elder that mimics dementia such as rocking, sucking or mumbling to oneself
Broken bones, sprains or dislocations
Caregiver’s refusal to allow you to see the elder alone
Torn, stained or bloody underclothing
Unusual weight loss, malnutrition or dehydration
Unsanitary living conditions such as dirt, bugs, soiled bedding and clothes

close
Elder Abuse
If an individual believes that they are witnessing an act of family violence and they have questions, they are encouraged to call, text or send an instant message for answers and advice that can help.

The resource line should not replace calling 911 in case of an emergency or any other 24-hour emergency crisis hotline.

The person can expect to receive information on family violence, appropriate referrals and tools to become a more informed bystander.

Many victims avoid using the criminal justice system when experiencing family violence, for valid reasons. Because of this, a community response is necessary. Below are three common concerns that prevent bystanders from responding and several ways the campaign addresses those concerns.

Fear (What if they come after me?)

I worry that the abuser may find out if I call and come after my loved ones or me.
I also worry that things might get worse if I call and stir things up.

You should be aware that calls, texts and instant messages are confidential sources of support.

Uncertainty (What if I am wrong?)

I’m not confident that what I’m seeing is family violence.
I worry about what might happen if I’m wrong.
I’m not sure where to turn for advice.

Become aware and familiar with the signs of family violence.
You should feel encouraged to call and ask questions.

Privacy (Is this any of my business?)

I recognize that something is going on that looks like family violence. However, I don’t want to be dragged into someone else’s drama.
I think someone else will take care of it.
What happens in someone’s home is none of my business.

Become knowledgeable about the impact you can make! Your call, text or message can really make a difference.

All calls, texts and instant messages are anonymous and confidential. The caller is greeted and asked how they could be helped. Texts and instant messages will be answered as they are received and are provided the link to our website for further information.

If the caller discloses there is immediate danger, the call will be transferred to 911. All efforts are made to provide the caller with the best response and appropriate resource.

The person is asked for at least their zip code, but sharing information is completely optional.  All calls, texts and instant messages are anonymous and confidential.
The Information Coordinator (IC) at The Center for Family Safety and Healing manages the calls, texts and instant messages.

The IC uses reliable information tools and resources to help inform and to safely report or provide information to those in need.

  • By telephone 844-234-LINE (5463)
  • By texting 87028
  • By instant message at wherestheline.info

These options are available Monday through Friday between
10AM and 6PM

The Center for Family Safety and Healing is a private non-profit that fully addresses all aspects of family violence, including child abuse and neglect, teen dating abuse, domestic violence and elder abuse.  For more information about The Center for Family Safety and Healing, visit or connect with us at:

www.FamilySafetyandHealing.org

familysafetyandhealing

@TCFSH_

3

Million Children nationally are affected by abuse each year

5

Children Die Every Day in the U.S. due to Neglect and Abuse

1

It only takes ONE decision to help a victim

33

Percent of U.S. Teens have been a victim of abuse by a dating partner

 Chat With Us Now

Monday-Friday 10AM-6PM

Our anonymous chat will connect you with the Information Coordinator to get specific advice.

 Videos

From the “Where’s The Line?” Campaign

Watch and Share with others. Together, we can break the cycle of abuse.

 
 
 

 Featured Articles

Recent Articles from “Where’s The Line?”

VIEW ALL ARTICLES

2017 TCFSH Employee Appreciation Event
07/28/2017

Each year, we set aside a day to celebrate TCFSH employees and their dedication to help break the cycle of family violence in our community. While the day was formerly known as a retreat, we switched […]

read more



What Does Mandated Reporting Mean?
07/28/2017

While child abuse and neglect can be a tough topic to discuss, once you suspect or learn of abuse or neglect, you must make a choice: to report, or not. While everyone should and can […]

read more



June 15, 2017 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD)
06/16/2017

Each year, 2 million older adults in the United States are at risk to experience some type of abuse. Elder abuse is any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a […]

read more



CAP4Kids Provides Family-Friendly Resources, Events for Central Ohio Residents
06/05/2017

The Children’s Advocacy Project, better known as CAP4Kids, can help Ohio residents find community agencies and resources to improve the lives of children and families. The CAP4Kids mission is to help bridge the gap between […]

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Contact

“Where’s The Line?”

For additional Answers and Help.  Always Confidential.

Text: 87028.
Monday-Friday 10AM-6PM.

Copyright © 2017 The Center for Family Safety and Healing.
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